Click here to visit Shefa Mehadrin's website
Click here to view JS's website
Home
Add Kosherpages to your favourites
Make Kosherpages your home page

Advertisement
 

Manchester Eruv

Advertisement
 
Kosherpages
Updates

Kosherpages Updates

March 05 Kosherpages launches 

December 05 - KP goes national.

June 06 - KP launches business networking events

January 07 - 1st B2B tradeshow

January 08 - 1st Kosher Lifestyle Show

August 08 - Parent & child networking event at the Odeon Manchester

September 08
- Launch of new film review section

September 08 - KP announces The Fed as chosen charity for this year

November 08 - Launch of new Medical Blog By Dr. Martin Harris

March 09 - Kosher Lifestyle Show Manchester

March 09 - Launch of The Kosher Brochure

May 10 - New Owners of KosherPages

June 10 - New look KosherPages

July 10 - KosherPages expands to include Jewish communities nation wide

July 10 - Pick of the Week is introduced to KosherPages - A joke, a quote, a Dvar Torah and more

August 10 - KosherPages now has a Facebook group - come and join us!

November 10 - Your health matters is added to KosherPages

November 10 - New addition to KosherPages - Kosher Fitness column

January 11 - KosherPages introduces "Your Pix" to Pick of the Week

July 11 - Safety First section is added to KosherPages

November 11 - The KosherPages Facebook group reaches 1,000 members

November 11 - KosherPages introduces the monthly competition

March 12 - KosherPages introduces new style "Shabbos Times & More" email. Click here to subscribe.

 

 

 

Do you have a Dvar Torah you would like to share on KosherPages?

If so we would love to include it, please use our contact form to send it through to us.


Shemini

Thursday, 28th March 2019

This week's parsha (Torah portion) contains the first occurrence of the laws related to identifying Kosher animals, fish, and fowl in the Torah. The pasuk (verse) says: "But this is what you shall NOT eat from among those that bring up their cud or that have split hooves: the camel (gamal), for it brings up its cud but its hoof is not split (parsah einenu mafris) – it is impure to you; and the hyrax (shafan), for it brings up its cud but its hoof is not split (parsah lo yafris)– it is impure to you; and the hare (arneves), for it brings up its cud, but its hoof is not split (parsah lo hifrisa) – it is impure to you." [Vayikra 11:4-6].

There is a striking inconsistency here. With the camel, the verb used to discuss the fact that the hoof is not split is conjugated in the present tense: "Parsah einenu MAFRIS" [the hoof IS NOT split]. Yet with the shafan, the verb is in the present "Parsah lo YAFRIS" [the hoof WILL NOT BE split]. Finally, with the arneves, the verb used is in the past tense: "Parsah lo HIFRISA" [the hoof WAS NOT split].

This is glaring. The terms should all be present, all future, or all past tense. There has to be a message here in the fact that the Torah uses a different form of the verb for each of these three animals.

A beautiful homiletic thought on this matter: When someone is about to pronounce "Tameh" [Impure] on a species or on any entity, one needs to be aware of its past, its present, and its future. Unless one is aware of the situation in the past, present, and future, one does not know the whole story and should not be so quick to pronounce the words "Tameh hu" [this one is impure].

One of the teachers at Bais Yaakov told the following story: There was a couple who went through the Holocaust. Before the Holocaust, they were fully observant of Torah and Mitzvos (all of it's commandments). After the Holocaust, unfortunately, the husband lost faith and said "That's it! I've had it with G-d!" The husband gave up every thing in terms of religious practice and belief.

His wife did not have that reaction. She begged her husband -- "At least go to shul (Synagogue)." The husband refused. This went on for a while. Finally the wife said to the husband, "Listen, do me a favor. Every morning you go out and buy a newspaper and you read it from cover to cover. Humor me, when you pick up the paper at the newsstand, rather than coming home to read it, go to shul and read the paper in shul -- just to make me happy!"

The husband wanted to please his wife. He spent the time reading the newspaper anyway, so he agreed to her proposal. He would go to shul every morning, sit in the back row and read the paper. This went on for years.

Now ask yourselves: If you saw a fellow come into the back row of your shul every morning, not put on Tallis (prayer shawl) or Tefillin (Phylacteries), not take a Siddur (prayer book) off the shelf, but simply make himself comfortable and read the newspaper for 45 minutes, what would your reaction be?

Most likely our reaction would be very negative. "If you want to read the newspaper, go home and read the newspaper! How dare you be so disrespectful of this holy synagogue?"
 
To their credit the people in this particular shul did not say anything critical to this individual. They did not chastise him. They began to schmooze (chat) with him, they invited him to join them for a l'chaim (drink) after davening when someone had a Yahrtzeit, they invited him to join them in social gatherings. To make a long story short, this Holocaust survivor went from reading the newspaper in the back row of the shul every day to davening in shul three times a day! Eventually, he even became president of the shul.

What does that tell us? Our inclination would have been to immediately pronounce "Tameh who lachem -- this species is definitely not a kosher animal"! But we did not know the fellow's past. We were not clear about his present situation, and we certainly could not have guessed what his future turned out to be. This is what the Torah is teaching. In order to proclaim "This one is Tameh" we must know that the hoof was not split in the past, the hoof is not currently split, and the hoof will never be split in the future. 
 
Short of that do not be so quick to say "Tameh hu lachem."

Revealing The Hidden

Monday, 18th March 2019

 

Purim: Revealing The Hidden - Rabbi Tzvi Sytner

Click here to watch the video from Aish

Cl

Vayikra

Thursday, 14th March 2019

"He (the priest) shall split it (with its feathers), he need not sever it ......." (Vayikra 1:17)
When a person feels inclined to give an offering to G-d, he may do so with the "Olah" sacrifice. If the person is poor, he may bring a dove as a sacrifice. This dove was offered on the alter with its feathers. Rashi comments that even though the smell of burning feathers is offensive, the sacrifice from this poor man still adorns the alter and is accepted by G-d. 
 
There is an important lesson that we can learn from the poor man’s sacrifice.
 
We all feel some doubt at times in regard to our spiritual growth and might feel that we are somewhat unable to reach great spiritual heights as compared to the many great sages and Rabbis and give up. This notion is a fallacy when we begin to see how precious burning feathers are when offered by a poor man.  Even burning feathers when offered with sincerity can be accepted by G-d.  When a person has nothing to offer G-d except for 'feathers', then that should still be offered. 
 
If we deem ourselves lacking ability, we should still learn Torah and offer G-d what we can even if perhaps the Torah learning may not be as grand as our friends. Even if our Torah might be like "burning feathers", we should offer it anyhow, even if only for the sake of giving whatever we have, to G-d. 
 
A king once decreed that whoever brings him the most precious item, that person will be granted a great title and prestige in the kingdom. Many people brought various magnificent and precious objects, yet the king seemed unimpressed for he already posessed many great treasures. However, in this kingdom lived a very poor man who also wished to particpate in this contest.

Although he had nothing of value, he did have a single penny. This penny was very dirty and dull in appearance, so this poor fellow decided to shine it and clean it until it sparkled.

He spent many hours shining the penny untill a magnificent shine emerged that literally lit up the room. This poor man travelled to the capital in order to gain an audience with the king so that he can present his item to the king. When the poor man presented the penny to the king, its shine was so magnificent that at first the king had mistakenly mistook the penny for a very precious gem with illuminating qualities, but after further observation it became apparent that this gem was actually just a very shiny penny.

The king then truly understood the real value of this poor man’s "most precious Item".
We must never underestimate what we personally have to offer, as long as it is given with sincerity and heart. 
 
In Talmud Barachos 5b the Sages said, "It is the same whether one does more or less, provided he intends it for the sake of Heaven".

Pekudei

Tuesday, 5th March 2019

And all the work of the Mishkan Ohel Mo'ed (Tabernacle) was finished; and the Israelites did according to all that G-d commanded Moshe (Moses), so they did (Exodus 39:32). 
 
This verse seems to be the wrong way round! Shouldn't it first say that the Israelites did according to all that G-d commanded Moshe (regarding the Tabernacle), and then say they finished making the items required for the Tabernacle? 
 
The Oznayim LaTorah explains that the latter part of the verse actually refers to all the other Mitzvot (Commandments) of the Torah which G-d commanded Moshe; it does not refer to the building of the Tabernacle. Therefore, the Torah is teaching that the Israelites completed the Tabernacle and subsequently observed the other Mitzvot. However, if this is so, why would the Torah mention this Mitzvah observance specifically upon completion of the Tabernacle? 
The Oznayim LaTorah answers by quoting the Mishnah: "One Mitzvah leads to another Mitzvah and one sin leads to another sin" (Pirkei Avot 4:2) .

G-d created a person with a balanced equilibrium in that he is inclined to do good as well as evil. When a person performs a Mitzvah he inclines his nature to the good. This now makes it easier for him to do more good deeds because he has tilted the balance in that direction. Similarly, if a person sins, he has imbued in himself a disposition to sin because that is the way he has influenced himself. It will now be easier for him to sin. 

At Mount Sinai after receiving the Torah, the Israelites' disposition was strongly in favour of Mitzvah performance to the degree where they approached the lofty level of angels, and actually found it difficult to sin. However, this changed with the golden calf. The sin of idolatry is so severe and damaging to the soul, that it not only negated the impact of the revelation at Sinai but tilted the balance the other way making it easier for them to sin! 

The Mitzvah to build the Tabernacle was to atone for the sin of making the golden calf. After they completed building the Tabernacle, they erased the effects of that sin and once more became inclined to perform Mitzvot. Hence, after they finished manufacturing all the items required for the Tabernacle and were ready to erect it, the Torah could state once again that "the Israelites did according to all that G-d commanded Moshe - refering to all of the other Mitzvot".

Pikudei

Tuesday, 5th March 2019

And all the work of the Mishkan Ohel Mo'ed (Tabernacle) was finished; and the Israelites did according to all that G-d commanded Moshe (Moses), so they did (Exodus 39:32). 
 
This verse seems to be the wrong way round! Shouldn't it first say that the Israelites did according to all that G-d commanded Moshe (regarding the Tabernacle), and then say they finished making the items required for the Tabernacle? 
 
The Oznayim LaTorah explains that the latter part of the verse actually refers to all the other Mitzvot (Commandments) of the Torah which G-d commanded Moshe; it does not refer to the building of the Tabernacle. Therefore, the Torah is teaching that the Israelites completed the Tabernacle and subsequently observed the other Mitzvot. However, if this is so, why would the Torah mention this Mitzvah observance specifically upon completion of the Tabernacle? 
The Oznayim LaTorah answers by quoting the Mishnah: "One Mitzvah leads to another Mitzvah and one sin leads to another sin" (Pirkei Avot 4:2) .

G-d created a person with a balanced equilibrium in that he is inclined to do good as well as evil. When a person performs a Mitzvah he inclines his nature to the good. This now makes it easier for him to do more good deeds because he has tilted the balance in that direction. Similarly, if a person sins, he has imbued in himself a disposition to sin because that is the way he has influenced himself. It will now be easier for him to sin. 

At Mount Sinai after receiving the Torah, the Israelites' disposition was strongly in favour of Mitzvah performance to the degree where they approached the lofty level of angels, and actually found it difficult to sin. However, this changed with the golden calf. The sin of idolatry is so severe and damaging to the soul, that it not only negated the impact of the revelation at Sinai but tilted the balance the other way making it easier for them to sin! 

The Mitzvah to build the Tabernacle was to atone for the sin of making the golden calf. After they completed building the Tabernacle, they erased the effects of that sin and once more became inclined to perform Mitzvot. Hence, after they finished manufacturing all the items required for the Tabernacle and were ready to erect it, the Torah could state once again that "the Israelites did according to all that G-d commanded Moshe - refering to all of the other Mitzvot".

Parashas Shekalim

Wednesday, 27th February 2019

Our holy sages, instituted the reading of 4 special "parashiyos - sections of the Torah" in (or near) the month of Adar, as a commemoration of 4 special Mitzvos. 

The first of the "4 Parashiyos" is Parashas Shekalim which falls on this coming Shabbos. This reading can be found in the beginning of Ki Sisa Perek 30 Pesukim 11 thru 16. 

This reading is to commemorate the Mitzvah of "Machatzis Hashekel - the half Shekel coin", which every Jew was obligated to give each year to the special fund from which the daily "Korbanos Tomid - sacrificial lambs" were purchased, that were offered in the Bais HaMikdash - Temple, each morning and evening.  
Although we do not have a Bais HaMikdash today, we "perform" this Mitzvah by reading about it in the Torah.

Vayakhel

Wednesday, 27th February 2019

Why do women sometimes feel left out of many Jewish practices? 

"Why do I have to dance on this side of the mechitza (partition)?" "Why can't I lead the prayers in the synagogue?" "Why can't I learn all day?" “Why can’t I be a Rabbi? 

This weeks Torah portion gives women plenty to be proud of! They actually were able to use their talents and helped build the mishkon (Tabernacle)! 

The verse (35:25) says that all the talented women spun the wool for the Mishkan. The verse also points out that all the work for the Mishkan was done by Nedivei Lev (generous volunteers). 

The Chasam Sofer asks, since a woman's earnings belong to her husband (gemora kesubos) how can she volunteer her services if it doesn't belong to her? 

He answers that the reason why Chazal (the Sages) decreed that a woman's earnings should go to her husband is because he supports her. In the Midbar (desert) where everyone lived from "Mannah" that fell from heaven, the men had no claim on the earnings of their wife. Therefore the women were free to use their talents for the task of building the Mishkan.

Ki Sisso

Sunday, 24th February 2019

The wealthy shall not increase and the poor shall not decrease from 1/2 a shekel....................."(30:15)

Hashem (G-d) is commanding Moshe (Moses) to make a count of the males from the age of 20 and up. Each male would only be allowed to give 1/2 a shekel, and by so doing the males would be counted. A question, can be asked as follows: Why was a 1/2 shekel chosen?

The Alshich explains that the half is to remind us that we are not complete - we are still working towards completing ourselves.

Another possible answer in the same vein, the wealthy of verse 30:15 is perhaps referring to a person who is rich in Torah and Mitzvoth, and the poor of the verse is referring to a person who is lacking in good deeds. When the Torah commands these individuals to give 1/2 a shekel, there is a lesson that the Torah wishes to teach these individuals that is pertinent to their particular circumstance. A person who has done a lot of good might think that he has reached his potential and need not be concerned any further in trying to improve himself. Yet when the Torah commands him to give 1/2 a shekel, he soon realizes that what his giving is only 1/2 not a whole. He will soon realize that he too is only 1/2 of what he could be, and will begin to examine his ways as to how he can further improve his ways even better. No human being is truly complete, only G-d is perfect.

Tetzaveh

Wednesday, 13th February 2019

The only weekly Torah portion - Parsha (since He was Born and forgetting much of Dvorim where Moshe speaks in first Person) where we do not find Moshe's (Moses’s) name written is the Parsha of this week, Parshas Tetzaveh.

The Baal HaTurim explains that after Cheit HaEgel (the sin of the Golden Calf) Moshe told Hashem (G-d) that if He doesn't forgive Bnei Yisroel (the children of Israel), then He should erase Moshe's name from the Sefer Torah. Although Hashem forgave them, nevertheless a tzaddik's (righteous person’s) words do not go unheeded and Moshe was left out of Parshas Titzaveh.

So why Tetzaveh? The Vilna Gaon says the reason for Moshe's absence is that the 7th (of the Hebrew month of) Adar, Moshe's Yahrtzeit (anniversary of death), almost always falls out in the week of Tetzaveh. Since he left us this week his name doesn't appear.

Nevertheless says the Vilna Gaon, Moshe's name is hidden in the Parsha. There are 101 pasukim (verses) in the parsha. If you take the hidden letters in Moshe's name it equals 101. Mem is spelled Mem, Mem the second "hidden" mem = 40. Shin is spelled Shin, Yud Nun, the hidden yud and nun equal = 60. Hey is spelled Hey, Aleph = 1 for a total of 101.

We see from here, says the Vilna Gaon, that even after the gashmiyos (physical) of Moshe, his exterior body was taken from us, nevertheless his ruchniyos (spiritual), his Neshama (soul) is still with us.

Teruma

Wednesday, 6th February 2019

This week's sidra (Torah portion) begins

“Veosu Lee Mikdash - make me a sanctuary”

 

Rashi explains  that a mikdash is  Bayis lekedusha - a house/home for holiness

 

How is this possible?

 

If we look at the gematria (is a numerological system by which Hebrew letters correspond to numbers) we can get a clue

 

MIKDASH=444

BAYIS=412

 

The difference between them is 32=Lamed Bays = Lev = heart

 

To transform a house into a sanctuary you need the hearts and devotion of the builders!

Advertisement
 

Click On My Logo
 

Advertisement
 

Advertisement